Case Studies for Organizational Communication

 

case studies for organizational communication

Apr 27,  · Alexander Lyon presents 31 case studies in organizational communication that explore issues of courageous communication. Through case studies on many well-known organizations such as Google, the Miami Dolphins, NASA, Comcast, the Boy Scouts of America, Netflix, Taco Bell, Massachusetts General Hospital, Merck Pharmaceuticals, and others, the book articulates a /5(19). Description. Case studies offer students the opportunity to explore critical incidents and develop effective strategies for resolution. Featuring the exclusive, real-life case studies of top communication scholars, Case Studies for Organizational Communication: Understanding Communication Processes, Third Edition, employs a unique applied approach that allows students to use their knowledge of. Through these case studies, students are able to directly assess ethical and unethical decision making in a rich, diverse, and complex manner that moves beyond simple explanations of ethics. This book is an invaluable resource for students and those interested in organizational communication ethics.


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Forgot your login information? Edited by: Steve May, case studies for organizational communication. May, S. May, Steve, ed. May, S ed, case studies for organizational communication. SAGE Knowledge. Have you created a personal profile? Login or create a profile so that you can create alerts and save clips, playlists, and searches.

Please log in from an authenticated institution or log into your member profile to access the email feature. View Copyright Page. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including case studies for organizational communication, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher, case studies for organizational communication.

Communication in organizations—Moral and ethical aspects. May, Steve Steve Kent I first considered editing a case study book on organizational ethics nearly a decade ago. As an instructor of organizational communication, I was frustrated by two features that were lacking in most textbooks in the field. First, I found that many of the primary textbooks in organizational communication included few, if any, case studies.

By contrast, Business and Management programs had a long and successful history with case-based teaching and, as a result, cases were widely available. Yet, they did not necessarily offer the range and variety of perspectives I wanted my students to learn. Although I had developed many of my own cases over the years, including a semester-long consulting case, I wondered why there was such a lack of cases in organizational communication textbooks. Most textbooks included discussion questions and even the occasional homework or fieldwork assignment, but these features never provided the extensive application of organizational theory that in-depth cases provided for my students.

When cases were included in textbooks, they were typically short and general in their description of organizational phenomena. Until recently, there was even a lack of supplemental case study books to use in introductory or advanced organizational communication courses. I wanted more for my students. Second, it also became clear that few, if any, textbooks included an extensive discussion of organizational ethics.

Given the range and scope of organizational misconduct over the past several decades, it struck me as a glaring omission in our teaching. Based on conversations with other colleagues around the world, I knew that many instructors were, at least implicitly, discussing organizational ethics in their classrooms.

But I found that many were reluctant to explicitly identify organizational ethics as an issue in their courses. Textbooks were not much help.

When they included ethics, it was often relegated to a concluding chapter. For example, rarely were nonprofit organizations, government agencies, universities, case studies for organizational communication, or other collectives discussed in them.

In addition, they often included classic, historical cases of ethics rather than recent emerging ethical issues most relevant to today's students.

The confluence of these two pedagogical frustrations was further case studies for organizational communication in motion with the series of organizational scandals e.

For this second edition, they have been further compounded by the ethical misconduct in the financial sector that has produced the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. For years, my former students had contacted me about their own personal ethical dilemmas in organizations, but now my current students were asking important but challenging questions: What went wrong case studies for organizational communication [Page xii] these organizations? How common are such unethical practices in organizations?

Is this a new phenomenon? What should I do if I belong to an organization that engages in unethical behavior? What if I observe a boss or coworker engaging in such behavior? What changes are necessary in order to improve the ethical conduct of organizations and the people in them? What can I do to help? Their questions led to informative, instructive, and wide-ranging discussions of organizations and ethics, but I wanted a framework for discussing ethical issues with them in both a theoretical and a pragmatic way.

This book, then, is an attempt to focus and structure a meaningful and productive dialogue about organizational ethics with students. It is designed to integrate case studies for organizational communication theory and practice in order to strengthen students' ethical awareness, judgment, and action in organizations by exploring ethical dilemmas in a diverse range of cases.

For this, the second edition of the book, the need to improve our ethical behavior in organizations seems even more pronounced. The book may be used in a variety of ways. Ideally, its availability will prompt some instructors to begin teaching courses on organizational ethics. In such courses, it may be used as a primary textbook.

Or it may be used as a supplemental text for an introductory or advanced course in organizational communication. The book will serve as an excellent companion to a primary textbook in order to bring ethics to the foreground of students' attention. In addition, instructors will notice that many of the cases can be easily applied to common theories of organizational communication such as classical management, human relations, systems theory, critical theory, and postmodern theory.

This ethics case study book is based on the belief that organizational theory and practice have become increasingly wide ranging and diverse in the past two decades. Similar to the emergence of new, diverse theories to understand organizations, organizations themselves are growing more and more complex. Members of organizations are asking themselves the following questions: What are our mission, vision, and goals? What do we value? What principles should guide our case studies for organizational communication with our multiple stakeholders?

Instead, case studies for organizational communication, questions of ethics are being taken seriously by many organizations around the world, particularly now that executives and boards of directors have realized that ethics may actually enhance individual and organizational performance. Rather than being viewed as merely a compliance or crisis issue, ethics is now seen as part of the bottom line.

The intent of this book, then, is to raise students' awareness regarding ethics and to provide them with the tools to evaluate situations and conduct themselves ethically.

It introduces students to a broad, yet context-specific range of ethics-oriented issues in organizations that will supplement and extend their understanding of organizational communication. The book is based on the belief that students are best engaged when they can directly address the challenges and opportunities they will encounter in their own organizational lives. Often these challenges and opportunities converge around ethical dilemmas that workers experience, as they seek to negotiate their interests with those of their organization.

As a pedagogical tool, this book is designed to encourage students' critical thinking skills about ethics through analysis, reflection, and dialogue. Organizational ethics cases do not present easy, linear answers to organizational problems and, as a result, students will learn to explore complex, contextual, case studies for organizational communication, and conflicted questions about organizational life in ways that integrate theory and practice. A primary purpose of the book, then, is to further develop students' understanding of organizations by stimulating analysis and discussion of specific organizational practices that enable or constrain ethical action, thereby provoking multiple alternatives or solutions that are made more accessible to them.

Additional features of the book include the following:. On the other hand, they are even more dissatisfied when courses have no clear [Page xiv] bearing on everyday life, case studies for organizational communication. One of the ways to bridge this dichotomy is to recognize that understanding is the joint product of theory and common sense, case studies for organizational communication.

Ideally, then, this book should combine theory and practice as it relates to organizational ethics. My assumption is that the two are mutually dependent, case studies for organizational communication. For instance, we all use implicit theories of the world around us to guide our behaviors. When those theories do not seem applicable to everyday life, then we adjust them accordingly. The same should hold true for the theories and practice of organizational ethics.

Through this book, students will examine various theories of organizational ethics. Yet each ethical perspective should also be judged according to its applicability to the cases in this book, case studies for organizational communication.

By studying these specific organizational cases, students should develop the critical thinking skills to determine which theories are applicable and which theories are not. Yet, this appreciation—and the knowledge that derives from it—cannot simply be told in a lecture. It is based on doing. In my teaching career, I have found that one of the primary teaching challenges is to provide students with concrete, context-specific knowledge that will supplement their past work experiences, which vary widely from student to student.

Many college students often need supplemental materials that ground their theoretical understanding in a practical understanding of organizational life, case studies for organizational communication.

This is particularly true in terms of ethical challenges that students may face once they enter or reenter the full-time workforce. Or they utilize the short, limited case studies that are often found at the end of chapters in textbooks. Finally, instructors often question whether a primary text, alone, allows students to confront—in a safe, classroom environment—the ethical dilemmas that many workers face in their careers.

In the future, then, I believe that students will need to understand both the theoretical developments in organizational communication and also how those developments are enacted in ethical organizational practice. This book, then, is designed to address this focus on praxis in a manner that clarifies the rapidly changing organizational environment—as well as the diversity of organizational practices that has followed these changes.

In short, students need an explicit mechanism by which they can compare and contrast a growing number of developments in organizations. In addition, students need to understand and appropriately act upon the various ethical dilemmas and challenges they will confront in the workplace. Case studies of ethical and unethical organizational practices are one of the primary means to accomplish these goals. The Introduction provides the context for organizational ethics and an overview of ethical perspectives and practices.

Case studies for organizational communication explores current and past examples of ethical case studies for organizational communication unethical conduct in organizations.

It also introduces students to some of the most important challenges for enhancing the ethics of organizations, as well as a means for analyzing ethical dilemmas they may face in organizations. Finally, the Introduction provides the theoretical foundation for students and is divided into two primary sections: 1 ethical perspectives and 2 ethical practices.

The section on ethical perspectives gives students an overview of common ethical theories such as duty, case studies for organizational communication, rights, utility, virtue, and relationships. These theories provide one means for students to assess the case studies. Any—or all—of the theories may be applied to each case study, although students may find that one theory is either more prominent or more relevant in a case.

The section on ethical practices explores several behaviors that are most common among ethical organizations, including alignment, dialogic communication, participation, transparency, accountability, and courage, case studies for organizational communication.

Each practice is then applied to both ethical and unethical organizations. Parts I through VI include 23 case studies that represent a range of organizational types and ethical dilemmas. Cases include not only business but also nonprofit organizations, universities, and government case studies for organizational communication.

 

Case Studies in Organizational Communication | SAGE Publications Inc

 

case studies for organizational communication

 

Description. Case studies offer students the opportunity to explore critical incidents and develop effective strategies for resolution. Featuring the exclusive, real-life case studies of top communication scholars, Case Studies for Organizational Communication: Understanding Communication Processes, Third Edition, employs a unique applied approach that allows students to use their knowledge of. Case Studies in Organizational Communication 2: Perspectives on Contemporary Work Life. by Beverly Davenport | May 9, out of 5 stars 4. Paperback $ $ Get it as soon as Mon, Aug FREE Shipping by Amazon. Only 1 left in stock - order soon. Case studies offer students the opportunity to explore critical incidents and develop effective strategies for resolution. Featuring the exclusive, real-life case studies of top communication scholars, Case Studies for Organizational Communication: Understanding Communication Processes, Third Edition, employs a unique applied approach that allows students to use their knowledge of.